You May Have Cocaine or Heroin on Your Fingerprints: Here’s Why

Researchers tested fingerprints from the unwashed hands of the drug-free volunteers and, despite having no history of drug use, still found traces of class A drugs. (Image: via pixabay / CC0 1.0)

Scientists have found that drugs are now so prevalent that 13 per cent of those taking part in a test were found to have traces of class A drugs on their fingerprints — despite never using them.

But there is no easy escape for users as researchers from the University of Surrey, who have previously developed a quick fingerprint test to identify users, have created a definitive way to prove the difference between those using cocaine and heroin, and those exposed to the drugs due to environmental factors.

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In a study published by Clinical Chemistry, researchers from the University tested the fingerprints of 50 drug free volunteers and 15 drug users who testified to taking either cocaine or heroin in the previous 24 hours.

Researchers tested fingerprints from the unwashed hands of the drug-free volunteers and, despite having no history of drug use, still found traces of class A drugs. Around 13 percent of fingerprints were found to contain cocaine and 1 percent contained a metabolite of heroin.

By setting a “cut-off” level, researchers were able to distinguish between fingerprints that had environmental contaminants from those produced after genuine drug use — even after people washed their hands.

To test the possibility of transferring drugs through a handshake, drug-free volunteers were asked to shake hands with a drug user. Fingerprints were then collected from the drug-free volunteers after contact.

Although cocaine and heroin can be transferred by shaking hands with a drug user, the cut-off level established allowed researchers to distinguish between drug use and secondary transfer.

Dr Melanie Bailey, Lecturer in Forensic Analysis at the University of Surrey, said:

Mahado Ismail, lead-author of the paper from the University of Surrey, said:

Provided by: University of Surrey [Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.]

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